Webinars

  • OCLC Research TAI CHI Webinar: How You Can Make the Transition from MARC to Linked Data Easier
NOV 5

OCLC Research TAI CHI Webinar: How You Can Make the Transition from MARC to Linked Data Easier

View this webinar recording to learn what metadata specialists can do now to make it easier to transform text strings in MARC data into the entity-“things” we later expose as linked data that others can consume. #oclcresearch #linkeddata

This event has passed.

 

Webinar files

Recording

  • View webinar recording on YouTube [link]
  • Download the webinar recording (.mp4) [link]

Slides

  • View webinar slides on SlideShare [link
  • Download webinar slides (.pptx) [link]

 

Description

From OCLC's experiences in datamining WorldCat to identify entities that can be exposed to the semantic Web, we've learned that there's a lot of data that can be parsed easily and made into "statements" – and sadly, a lot that cannot be without a lot more effort. In this webinar, Jean Godby and Karen Smith-Yoshimura of OCLC Research offered examples from their multilingual bibliographic structure and performers extraction adventures of what metadata specialists can do now to make it easier to transform text strings in MARC data into the entity-"things" we later expose as linked data that others can consume.

This is the 16th webinar in the OCLC Research Technical Advances for Innovation in Cultural Heritage Institutions (TAI CHI) Webinar Series, the goal of which is to highlight specific innovative applications, often locally developed, that libraries, museums and archives may find effective in their own environments, as well as to teach technical staff new technologies and skills.

Date

05 November 2015

Time

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Eastern Standard Time, North America [UTC -5]

 

We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed and sustained by members since 1967. Our public purpose is a statement of commitment to each other—that we will work together to improve access to the information held in libraries around the globe, and find ways to reduce costs for libraries through collaboration.