New Article in Code4Lib Journal describes mapFAST: A FAST Geographic Authorities Mashup with Google Maps

 
mapFAST is a mashup that uses Google Maps to present a different way to look at subject access to bibliographic records.

When looking for information about a particular place, it is often useful to check surrounding locations as well. This can be difficult using traditional controlled vocabularies. The FAST (Faceted Application of Subject Terminology) schema reworks Library of Congress Subject Headings rules to produce a more machine-friendly schema that can handle a large volume of materials more cheaply and efficiently.

FAST geographic subjects provide clean access points to geography-related material. A Google Maps mashup allows users to see surrounding locations that are also FAST subjects. The map interface allows for simple selection of a location, with links to enter it directly as a search into either WorldCat.org or Google Books.

Like the mapFAST prototype, the Web Service to the underlying data is also open and available for use. With it, developers can use the service to develop their own applications.

This article provides a brief background about mapFAST and FAST geographic data, as well as an overview of the mapFAST interface, its mechanics, and the mapFAST Web Service.

More Information

Bennett,Rick, Edward T. O'Neill, Kerre Kammerer, and JD Shipengrover. 2011. "mapFAST: A FAST Geographic Authorities Mashup with Google Maps." Code4Lib Journal, 14, 2011-07-25
http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/5645

mapFAST interface
http://experimental.worldcat.org/mapfast/

mapFAST activity page
http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/mapfast/

FAST (Faceted Application of Subject Terminology) activity page
http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/fast/

For more information:

Rick Bennett
Consulting Software Engineer
OCLC Research
bennetr@oclc.org
+1-614-761-5249

Robert C. Bolander
Senior Communications Officer
OCLC Research
bolander@oclc.org
+1-614-761-5207

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