Experimental service accepts an ISBN, returns set of ISBNs associated with same FRBR work; bookmarklet then uses to query library holdings

 
The experimental xISBN service supplies ISBNs associated with individual intellectual works represented in the OCLC WorldCat database.

Give it an ISBN, and it returns a list of associated ISBNs.

The ISBNs returned from the service can in turn be re-used in a query to a bibliographic database (e.g., via a FRBR Bookmarklet) to improve the chances of a user finding any/all instances of the work in a given database.

A user finding an item of interest at an online bookseller's (for example) could conveniently query his/her local library online catalog to find out if any editions or printings (hardback or paperback, first printing or third printing, and even cases where various titles have been used) of the item are held by the library.

As an experimental project of OCLC Research, this service is available without charge or guarantee. Access does not require registration or authentication. OCLC reserves the right to modify or discontinue the service without prior notice. The xISBN server is believed to be stable, have good uptime, and to have the capacity to handle a reasonably high volume of requests without a significant degradation of response time or service failures, but OCLC does not guarantee service levels for experimental systems.

More Information

xISBN project page
http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/past/orprojects/xisbn/

OCLC's FRBR bookmarklets project
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/xisbn/Bookmarks.html

For more information:

Thom Hickey
Chief Scientist
OCLC Research
hickey@oclc.org
+1-614-764-6075

Bob Bolander
Communications & Programs Manager
OCLC Research
bolander@oclc.org
+1-614-761-5207

We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed and sustained by members since 1967. Our public purpose is a statement of commitment to each other—that we will work together to improve access to the information held in libraries around the globe, and find ways to reduce costs for libraries through collaboration.