Karen Drabenstott is visiting scholar

DUBLIN, Ohio, April 27, 2000--Karen M. Drabenstott, associate professor, University of Michigan, has been named OCLC Visiting Distinguished Scholar for a seven-month term.

The Visiting Distinguished Scholar program is sponsored by the OCLC Office of Research to bring experienced scientists, educators and administrators to OCLC.

Dr. Drabenstott will design and develop a Web-based multimedia presentation to teach those without prior training how to use the Dewey Decimal Classification system to classify Web artifacts.

Since 1987, Dr. Drabenstott has been a member of the faculty of the University of Michigan, School of Information, where she has taught courses in the areas of bibliographic control, library automation, online searching and multimedia production. She has conducted research in the areas of subject access, classification, search strategies, digital libraries and visual images.

From 1981 to 1987, Dr. Drabenstott was a research scientist in the Office of Research at OCLC.

Dr. Drabenstott is the author of four books and over 100 research reports, journal articles and conference papers. She has been awarded research grants from the Council of Library Resources, the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation and OCLC.

The American Library Association has recognized Dr. Drabenstott's contributions to the field by awarding her the first Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology in 1998 and the Esther J. Piercy Award in 1988.

Dr. Drabenstott received a bachelor of arts degree from Johns Hopkins University, and a master of library science degree and a doctoral degree in library and information science, both from Syracuse University.

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