Terry Noreault promoted to vice president, OCLC Office of Research

DUBLIN, Ohio, Jan. 8, 1999--Terry Noreault, director of the OCLC Research and Special Projects Division, has been promoted to vice president, OCLC Office of Research, by Jay Jordan, OCLC president and chief executive officer.

Dr. Noreault came to OCLC in 1985 as a visiting distinguished scholar and later that year joined the OCLC staff as senior research scientist. In 1988, he was promoted to director, OCLC Reference Services Development. He was named director of Research and Special Projects in April 1994. "Under Terry's direction, the OCLC technical and research staff has performed the applied research that is the foundation for products and services such as the OCLC FirstSearch service and the OCLC SiteSearch suite," said Mr. Jordan. "Terry has also provided leadership in the development of global standards for metadata--cataloging information for remote electronic resources."

In his new position, Dr. Noreault will direct research at OCLC and support the integration of new technologies into OCLC products and services. He will also continue managing the OCLC SiteSearch software product, which provides integrated access to library resources to more than 3,000 libraries.

"The OCLC Office of Research is dedicated to research that both explores the place of the library in the changing technology environment and develops tools that enhance the productivity of libraries and their users," said Dr. Noreault.

Dr. Noreault is a graduate of the State University of New York-Oswego and holds a doctoral degree in information transfer from Syracuse University. He taught computer science at Colgate University and information science at the University of Pittsburgh School of Library and Information Science.

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