DEC 9

OCLC Research at the CNI Fall 2013 Membership Meeting

Senior Program Officer Ricky Erway is presenting at this meeting, and OCLC Research Library Partnership Vice President Jim Michalko is attending.

This event has passed.

Monday, 9 December

Time Session

2:30-3:30 p.m. EST

Accuracy in Web Analytics Reporting on Digital Libraries     

  • Kenning Arlitsch, Montana State University
  • Patrick Obrien, Montana State University
  • Martha Kyrillidou, Association of Research Libraries
  • Ricky Erway, OCLC Research

As part of their assessment and evaluation activities, libraries routinely report website and digital collections visits to their own institutions, professional organizations, and funding agencies. Publication downloads from institutional repositories are often included in this reporting as a way of demonstrating their value. Initial research by a team from Montana State University, OCLC Research and the Association of Research Libraries has demonstrated that reporting in all these areas can be grossly inaccurate, leading to a variance in numbers across the profession that makes it difficult to draw conclusions, build business cases, or engender trust. The inaccuracy runs in both directions with under-reporting of visits and downloads as much a problem as over-reporting. This presentation will build the case for our developing research and will suggest some preliminary solutions for improving the accuracy of Web analytics reporting.

  • 4:00-5:00 p.m. EST

Institutional Research Data Management: Policies, Planning, Services and Surveys

  • David Fearon, Johns Hopkins University
  • Andrew Sallans, Center for Open Science
  • Ricky Erway, OCLC Research

Using the ARL SPEC Kit framework, the research data management teams at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Virginia worked together over the past year to conduct a survey and produce a report on research data management services offered by ARL-member research libraries. This study built upon the "E-Science and Data Support Services" study published by ARL in 2010. The results of the survey were quite informative as a snapshot of current practices and serve as a benchmark for this emerging domain of library services. Additionally, the process of developing the study allowed our team to reflect on the macro issues surrounding provision of research data management services within library environments and in relation to campus-wide support. In addition to presenting key survey findings, this project briefing will include highlights of what we discussed in developing the study in relation to what we observed in the data. This talk will go beyond what we were able to report in the publication, providing useful lessons learned and insights which may help inform decisions for developing research data management services.        

Most universities have scrambled to respond to external requirements for data management plans, but the benefits of university-wide data planning and policy argue for a more proactive approach, involving all the stakeholders, to develop a high-level policy for responsible data planning and management. In her presentation, Ricky Erway will present the benefits and identify the various university stakeholders (Office of Research, Research Compliance Office, Information Technology, Academic Departments, the Researchers, and the Library) and the concerns they bring to the table, based on her recently published report, Starting the Conversation: University-wide Research Data Management Policy.  In the report, Ricky suggests a conversation among the stakeholders that addresses ownership, selection, retention periods, ethical considerations, openness, costs, preservation, access, and alternatives to local data management.

 

 

Start Date

09 December 2013

End Date

10 December 2013

Location

Washington, DC

Venue

Capital Hilton Hotel

 

Quick links:

CNI Fall 2013 Membership Meeting [link]

Starting the Conversation: University-wide Research Data Management Policy [link]

Ricky Erway [link]

Jim Michalko [link]

 

 

We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed and sustained by members since 1967. Our public purpose is a statement of commitment to each other—that we will work together to improve access to the information held in libraries around the globe, and find ways to reduce costs for libraries through collaboration.