Dublin Core Metadata—Exploration for Memory Institutions

This activity is now closed. The information on this page is provided for historical purposes only.

As the mainstream Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) progressed, RLG was an early explorer of the impact of the Dublin Core on the practices of research institutions such as libraries, museums, and archives. Would they make use of Dublin Core? In what ways might they use it? Would it change any of their processes—or merely add to them?

In 1997 RLG hosted a "Metadata Summit" to explore these topics. Since then, we have continued to be involved in significant efforts to advance the Dublin Core from concept to practice—such as the best practices guide developed by CIMI on behalf of the museum community and the DCMI Libraries Working Group discussions to create an application profile for libraries' use of the Dublin Core.

Participants

Twenty-three invited participants attended the summit meeting; these included individuals chosen because they could either represent or address concerns of one or more research communities or standards efforts. Since many participants "wore multiple hats," each was asked to ensure representation for at least one particular community. Those communities are indicated in parentheses below.

Those named in italics were the meeting planners.

Murtha Baca (Categories for the Description of Works of Art)
Project Manager, Standards and Research Databases
Getty Information Institute

Nancy Brodie (National Library of Canada, Government Information Locator Service)
Information Resource Management
National Library of Canada

Joseph Busch (general museum community)
Program Manager
Getty Information Institute

John Byrum (Library of Congress)
Regional and Cooperative Cataloging Division
Library of Congress

Sherman Clarke (Visual Resources Association)
Head, Original Cataloging
New York University

Jim Coleman (Text Encoding Initiative)
Head, Academic Computing for the Humanities
Stanford University

Stephen Davis (Unable to attend)
Director, Library Systems, Columbia University

Michael Fox (Encoded Archival Description)
Head of Processing
Minnesota Historical Society

Peter Graham (TEI/Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities)
Associate University Librarian
Rutgers University

Dianne Hillman (National Digital Library Federation)
Olin Library
Cornell University

Sherry Kelley (Dublin Core Task Force of the ALCTS Committee on Cataloging: Access and Description)
Head, Cataloging Services Department
Smithsonian Institution Libraries

Lynn Marko (Committee on Institutional Cooperation; National Digital Library Federation)
Head, Cataloging
University of Michigan

Sally McCallum (MARC)
Chief, MARC Standards Office
Library of Congress

Janet McCue (library technical processing community)
Head, Technical Services Division
Mann Library
Cornell University

John Perkins (Consortium for Computer Interchange of Museum Information)
Executive Director
Consortium for Computer Interchange of Museum Information

Cecelia Preston (Coalition for Networked Information)
Preston & Lynch

Merrilee Proffitt (American Heritage Project)
Computer Resource Specialist, Library
University of California, Berkeley

Margaretta Sander (Facilitator)
Consortium for Computer Interchange of Museum Information

Lyn Elliot Sherwood (Canadian Heritage Information Network)
Director General
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Joan Swanekamp (ALCTS Committee on Cataloging: Access and Description)
Head, Cataloging Department
Yale University

Don Thornbury (library technical processing community)
Head, Catalog Division
Princeton University

Stuart Weibel (Dublin Core)
Consulting Research Scientist
OCLC

Robin Wendler (National Digital Library Federation Metadata Task Group)
Bibliographic Analyst
Harvard University

Robert Wolven (preservation community)
Director of Bibliographic Control
Columbia University

Jennifer Younger (unable to attend)
Assistant Director for Technical Services, Ohio State University

RLG staff members participating:

Willy Cromwell-Kessler
Ricky Erway
Robin Dale
Ed Glazier
Karen Smith-Yoshimura
Anne Van Camp

We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed and sustained by members since 1967. Our public purpose is a statement of commitment to each other—that we will work together to improve access to the information held in libraries around the globe, and find ways to reduce costs for libraries through collaboration.