3M Standard Interchange Protocol (SIP)

All options

::SIP,Debug
Host siphost.yourlib.org
Timeout 30
Expect login:
Send someuser\n
LoginUsername sipuser
LoginPassword sippass
LoginLocation somewhere
TerminalInstitution institution
TerminalPassword termpass
SIP
SIP2
/SIP

The SIP directive tells EZproxy to use SIP1 when communicating with the remote host. The SIP2 directive appears in EZproxy 4.0g (2007-03-12) or later to use SIP2 protocol.

When configuring, you should use either the SIP or SIP2 directive, but not both.

Whether using the SIP or SIP2 directive, the entry in user.txt always starts with ::SIP and always ends with /SIP.

Socket connection with no authentication

For SIP1, use:

::SIP
Host siphost.yourlib.org:1234
SIP
/SIP

For SIP2, use:

::SIP
Host siphost.yourlib.org:1234
SIP2
/SIP

The remainder of the example use the SIP directive for SIP1. You can substitute SIP2 in any of these examples of SIP2.

Socket connection with no authentication using SIP1

::SIP
Host siphost.yourlib.org:1234
SIP
/SIP

Socket connection with SIP username and password

::SIP
Host siphost.yourlib.org:1234
LoginUsername sipuser
LoginPassword sippass
LoginLocation EZproxy
SIP
/SIP

Telnet connection

::SIP
Host siphost.yourlib.org
Expect login:
Send someuser\n
Expect Password:
Send somepass\n
Expect Last login
SIP
/SIP

In the previous example, the username and password used to access SIP are sent as part of the telnet connection. The \n that appears in this example indicates that a newline should be sent, similar to pressing the enter key at the end of a line. If your SIP server requires a password during SIP negotiation, you can use an entry similar to this next example.

Telnet connection with SIP username and password

::SIP
Host siphost.yourlib.org
Expect login:
Send someuser\n
Expect Password:
Send somepass\n
Expect Last login
LoginUsername sipuser
LoginPassword sippass
LoginLocation EZproxy
SIP
/SIP