Did you know that you can change how long FirstSearch waits for a request before automatically ending a session?





While the default setting is 15 minutes, you can specify any time between 5 and 30 minutes to indicate how long FirstSearch should wait when there is no activity during a search session. You can type any number between 15 and 45 in the Full-Text Timeout box to indicate how long FirstSearch should wait while users read, print, or download full-text articles from their search results.

 Benefits of setting timeouts in FirstSearch:

·         You can choose the amounts of time that best fit your FirstSearch account combination of databases and full text.

·         Your users and staff will have adequate time to complete searching and reviewing search results without getting bumped off the system.

·         Your users and staff will have adequate time to read, print, or download full text online.

·         The system will be automatically freed up for others’ use if a user forgets to exit the program.

 All you need to do is:

 ·         Click on this link.  

·         Enter your FirstSearch administrative authorization and password on the administrative module login screen

 You will be taken directly to the Authentication/Access -> General area in your administrative module, where you can set the timeouts.

 If you would like to set timeouts in FirstSearch, but don’t have access to your library’s FirstSearch administrative module, please forward this message to the person at your library who can make the changes.

 Questions? Online help is available on the site, or contact your regional service provider or OCLC User and Network Support, or 1-800-848-5800.





Last revised: 11 October 2005



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