Worldwide

  • English

Projects and pilots

Trials, tests and works in progress

Whether it's an enhancement to an existing service or an entirely new way of dealing with library information, at OCLC we're always working to transform our industry research and analysis into usable products. Check here from time-to-time for an inside look at what we're currently working on.

Many of the products "under construction" have one or more hands-on trials or applications. Spend some time experimenting, and leave us comments.

Projects in "the works" are not complete and may not be fully functional or tested. Also, there's never a guarantee that they'll become finished, available products, but we do want you to sample what's cooking in the kitchen. Once a product moves out of "the works," you can look at the History page to find information about its past.


New tools or products

OCLC Library Spotlight Program

The OCLC Library Spotlight program gives any library, regardless of size, the chance to be found in more places online. This free directory service utilizes existing location and contact data to get started. Libraries can then update this information and add to their online profile with more details about their programs, hours-of-operation, web links, pictures and more. OCLC then syndicates this information through the “search for a library” service on WorldCat.org, and with other major online partners including Yelp.


Shared Print Management (May 2012)

Between January 2010 and March 2012, a pilot project was formed to develop recommendations for how libraries could use WorldCat to register content contributed to shared print archives. The committee consisted of representatives within and outside of OCLC, and additional experts were consulted, to ensure that the metadata guidelines and implementation procedures were consistent with community norms. Pilot participants contributed to the development of metadata guidelines, refined a procedure for registering print archive collections in WorldCat, tested record creation and contribution mechanisms, and evaluated the impact of print archive registration on current interlending practices.