Challenges of integrating researchers in authority files outlined in presentation and draft report

 

OCLC Research Program Officer Karen Smith-Yoshimura and MIT Libraries Director of Research and Brookings Institution Non-resident Senior Fellow Micah Altman presented "Integrating Researcher Identifiers into University and Library Systems" at the CNI Spring 2014 Membership Meeting. These slides are now available for downloading (.pptx: 6.0MB/47 slides) or viewing on SlideShare.  In addition, draft Researchers in Authority Files report (.docx: 813K/17 pp.) is available for community review and feedback.

A number of approaches to providing authoritative researcher identifiers have emerged, but they tend to be limited by discipline, affiliation or publisher. In this presentation, Karen and Micah provide an overview of the OCLC Research Registering Researchers in Authority Files Task Group's analysis of the complex ecosystem of systems and institutions that provide, aggregate and use name authorities and researcher identifier systems. Karen and Micah reflect on the state of the practice and on the remaining  challenges to  integrating researcher identifiers into the systems and practices of libraries and universities. They also solicit comments on the group's draft recommendations.

Key highlights from the presentation include:

  • Shift from academic publishing in books to journals=loss of sole-author-book for evaluation: how integrate name authority and researcher ID systems?
  • Scholars may be published under so many forms of names (esp. when translated) that string matching futile.
  • Same name representing different people requires additional attributes, especially for Chinese names.
  • OCLC Research task group identified 7 stakeholders for researcher IDs, use case scenarios, functional requirements, recommendations
  • Where are the researchers? Dispersed among different systems
  • Differences between traditional name authorities & researcher ID systems inc: stakeholders, organization, external integration, works & people covered
  • Complex environment: institutional members/maintainers overlap systems but do not necessarily coordinate. How disputed info is resolved often unclear.
  • Emerging trends:  Widespread recognition  that persistent identifiers for researchers needed;  interoperability between systems increasing. Some adoption trends.
  • It is time for universities to transition from watchful waiting to engagement: develop outreach, future-proof systems (“authors are not strings”), use and encourage identifiers.

This work is an outcome of the OCLC Research Registering Researchers in Authority Files activity, the goal of which is to create a concise report that summarizes the benefits and trade-offs of emerging approaches to the problem of incomplete national authority files. As a step toward that goal, the Registering Researchers in Authority Files Task Group has released a draft Researchers in Authority Files report (.docx: 813K/17 pp.) for community review and feedback. Comments to Karen Smith-Yoshimura at smithyok@oclc.org by 30 April would be most appreciated.

For more information:


Karen Smith-Yoshimura
Program Officer
OCLC Research
smithyok@oclc.org
+1-650-287-2141

Melissa Renspie
Senior Communications Officer
OCLC Research
renspiem@oclc.org
+1-614-761-5231

 

Quick links:

"Integrating Researcher Identifiers into University and Library Systems" slides

  • Download (.pptx: 6MB/47 slides) [link]
  • View on SlideShare [link]

Review draft Researchers in Authority Files report

  • Download (.docx: 813K/17 pp.) [link]
  • Send comments to Karen Smith-Yoshimura by 30 April 2014 [link]

Karen Smith-Yoshimura [link]

Micah Altman [link]  

CNI Spring 2014 Membership Meeting [link]

OCLC Research Registering Researchers in Authority Files activity [link

Registering Researchers in Authority Files Work in Progress [link]

OCLC Research presentations [link]

OCLC Research presentations on SlideShare [link]

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