The Sky is Not Falling! Opportunities Abound as Library Schools Become Information Schools

Mike Eisenberg

Professor and Dean Emeritus
The Information School of the University of Washington

Thursday,September 20, 2007

8:30-9:00 a.m.
Coffee & Pastries

9:00-10:30 a.m.
Presentation and Q&A

OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.
Kilgour Building—Auditorium
6565 Kilgour Place (formerly Frantz Road)
Dublin, OH 43017-3395

This presentation is free and open to the public.

Speaker abstract

“There’s a crisis in library education.  Library schools are closing. There won’t be enough librarians to fill the ranks of those retiring. Library schools aren’t teaching the fundamentals (such as cataloging and children’s services).  The very core of librarianship is in danger.”

These would be serious concerns if they were true; but they’re not. Library and information science programs are thriving as never before. Schools are expanding, with growing on-campus and distance library and information science programs and new degrees in information-related areas. The new information schools embrace, celebrate, and promote librarianship even as they move into new information areas. And, there are more students graduating with ALA-accredited degrees than ever before.

Mike Eisenberg, long-time library and information science educator and dean emeritus of the Information School of the University of Washington, will set the record straight regarding library education and the information school movement

Background information

Mike Eisenberg is the “founding dean” of the Information School at the University of Washington. During his tenure from 1998 to 2006, Mike transformed the unit from a single graduate degree into a broad-based information school with a wide range of research and academic programs, including an undergraduate degree in informatics, masters degrees in information management and library and information science (adding a distance learning program and doubling enrollment), and a doctorate degree in information science.
Mike is a frequent speaker, presenter, consultant, and recipient of several prestigious awards. His current efforts focus on information literacy, the expanding role of libraries, and information science education K-20.

Additional Information

Mike Eisenberg
http://projects.ischool.washington.edu/mbe/

 

Distinguished Seminar Series lectures are available online as PowerPoint and MP3 files shortly after the lecture at http://www.oclc.org/research/dss/ . Additional information about the Distinguished Seminar Series can also be found there.

A printable version of this announcement is available at: http://www.oclc.org/research/dss/pdf/eisenberg.pdf (.pdf: 67KB/1 p.)

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