2008

RLG Programs at ARLIS/NA 2008

May 3-4, 2008
Denver, Colorado


RLG Programs staff participated in the following meetings during " ARLIS/NA at Altitude," the Art Libraries Society of North America's 36th Annual Conference.


Saturday, May 3

Time Meeting

9:30–11:30 a.m. 

RLG Programs Round Table

This meeting provided a forum to explore the evolving RLG Programs work agenda, as well as the opportunity for RLG partners to get involved in ongoing projects and let us know what they'd like to see next on our agenda.

The agenda for this meeting, developed through a survey of our Art & Architecture partners was as follows:

  1. Spotlight:
  2. *Bringing special collections into the large-scale digitization milieu and "Shifting Gears"* *Museum data exchange project* *Last copies project*

    We spent a good chunk of time discussing these projects, including why partners felt these project were the most important to discuss, how these projects impacted their thinking around local issues, and how they'd like to get involved in potential further activities in these areas.

  3. Discussion: So much digitization, so little access?
  4. We spent another good chunk of time discussing the impact of mass digitization on the art library community, where (so far) few reap the direct benefit of public/private partnerships, but we know many are carefully monitoring developments. Recent RLG Programs project formed the backdrop for the discussion.

    Background:
    *Best practices for public/private digitization agreements*

    *Impact of digitization and copyright on shared print holdings* / *Copyright evidence findings*
  5. Briefings
  6. Round Robin Round-up:
  7. Amy Lucker (Institute of Fine Arts, NYU) reprised her breezy round robin round-up.

Our motto for this year's Round Table was "less Power Point, more discussion"!

Location: Mount Princeton Room at the Grand Hyatt Denver.

Contact: Günter Waibel or Dennis Massie


RLG Programs Officer Günter Waibel also presented on the NYARC4 Collection Analysis project at the ARLIS/NA Managing the Collective Collection Session (copied from the "ARLIS/NA at Altitude" Program and Schedule).


Sunday, May 4

Time Meeting
11:00 a.m. –12:30 p.m.

"ARLIS/NA at Altitude" Managing the Collective Collection Session

At this session, collaborative initiatives were surveyed from the broader library community to rethink how we acquire and manage collections, and explore the profound impact of mass digitization on both activities. Collaborations in the art library community in collections development, shared storage and joint digitization will require detailed knowledge of the overlap and uniqueness of collections. A case study of a collections analysis comparing four New York City art libraries rounded out the panel by providing a model for gathering the business intelligence needed to move forward.

Moderator:
Deborah Kempe
, Chief of Collections Management & Access, Frick Art Reference Library.

Speakers:
Lizanne Payne
, Executive Director, Washington Research Library Consortium.
Off-Site But Not Out of Reach: Trends in Shared Storage

Annette Haines, Art & Design Field Librarian, and Rebecca Price, Architecture, Urban Planning and Visual Resources Librarian, Art, Architecture & Engineering Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
We've Been Googlized: Our Experience with Mass Digitization at the Art, Architecture and Engineering Library, University Of Michigan

Günter Waibel, RLG Programs, OCLC and Milan Hughston, Chief of Library and Museum Archives, Museum of Modern Art.
Rarity is Common: A Case Study Measuring Overlap of the Collections of Four New York Art Libraries.

Information about this case study is available in an article in the OCLC Newsletter, NextSpace (Vol. 8, February 2008).

The full report is also available:
Lavoie, Brian, and Günter Waibel. An Art Resource in New York: The Collective Collection of the NYARC Art Museum Libraries. (.pdf: 136K/18 pp.)

Location: TBD

Contact: Günter Waibel

We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed and sustained by members since 1967. Our public purpose is a statement of commitment to each other—that we will work together to improve access to the information held in libraries around the globe, and find ways to reduce costs for libraries through collaboration.