OCLC Research Software Contest Judges

Kevin Clarke

Kevin S. Clarke is currently the Coordinator of Web Services at Belk Library and Information Commons, Appalachian State University. In this role, he manages the Library's digital initiatives and coordinates the activities of the Web Services team. Previously, he worked as the Digital Projects Programmer at Firestone Library, Princeton University, and as the Digital Information Systems Developer at Lane Medical Library, Stanford University.

Kevin holds a Master of Science in Information Science (MSIS) from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and has over nine years of experience developing integrative digital information systems. He also has a background in library metadata, having started his career in cataloging. He thinks of himself as a library technologist, mixing the best of library world with the best of the IT world.

He is the co-author of the book Putting XML to Work in the Library: Tools for Improving Access and Management and has presented and published on a variety of topics related to library metadata and digital information systems. For several semesters, he taught a course on XML at San Jose State University's School of Library and Information Science. He recently finished an article on XML for the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science .

Kevin Clarke

Thom Hickey

Thom Hickey is OCLC's Chief Scientist. His interests include electronic publishing, information retrieval and display, and metadata creation and editing systems. Thom currently leads a group that is implementing the Virtual International Authority File (VIAF), investigating algorithms for the FRBR grouping of bibliographic works, applications of linked data, Z39.50 and its Web equivalents SRW/U, and parallel processing of metadata.

Thom's group also maintains several open source systems, including the PURL software, the NDLTD harvest of electronic thesis metadata, and the Pears retrieval engine. Thom helped found the OCLC "research department," as it was originally called, in 1977.

Thom Hickey

Tod Matola

Tod is a Software Architect at OCLC and is currently working on the WorldCat Local project.

He has 15 years experience with the design and construction of large-scale, enterprise, web applications, with a focus on XML based search applications. Tod's language proficiencies include Java, Groovy, functional languages, Perl, and C. His interests include agile development, Open Source Software, REST style architectures, Linked Data, metadata management systems, and information retrieval.

Tod Matola

Ross Singer

Ross Singer is Interoperability and Open Standards Champion for Talis.

Prior to joining Talis, Ross worked as a developer for the Georgia Tech Library where he won the previous OCLC Software contest for his entry of the Ümlaut, a replacement interface for OpenURL link resolvers. He has also worked for the libraries at Emory University and the University of Tennessee.

Ross writes about library technology in his blog, Dilettante's Ball, and in his column for the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship , Memo from the Systems Office. He is also heavily involved in the Code4lib community.

Ross Singer

Roy Tennant

Roy Tennant is Senior Program Officer for OCLC Research.

He is the owner of the Web4Lib and XML4Lib electronic discussions, and the creator and editor of Current Cites, a current awareness newsletter published every month since 1990.

His books include Technology in Libraries: Essays in Honor of Anne Grodzins Lipow , Managing the Digital Library , XML in Libraries , Practical HTML: A Self-Paced Tutorial , and Crossing the Internet Threshold: An Instructional Handbook .

Roy wrote a monthly column on digital libraries for Library Journal for a decade and has written numerous articles in other professional journals.  In 2003, he received the American Library Association's LITA/Library Hi Tech Award for Excellence in Communication for Continuing Education.

Roy Tennant

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