the economic downturn – patrons with limited computer skills need to apply for jobs and social services online; and emerging technologies – library users demand access to downloadable books and interactive web technologies. In this session, Nancy Fredericks and Ruth O'Donnell will explore these changes and how libraries are responding to the new demands.

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Related resources referenced in session:

Date

02 December 2010

Time

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Eastern Standard Time, North America [UTC -5]

Venue

Webinar

Born to Forget: How to Survive and Thrive the Age of Information Overload
AUG 10

Born to Forget: How to Survive and Thrive in the Age of Information Overload

Archive and associated resources for August 10, 2011, session with Jay Turner as part of Trends in Library Training and Learning online conference.

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Born to Forget: How to Survive and Thrive in the Age of Information Overload

Originally presented August 10, 2011 as part of Trends in Library Training and Learning.

The brain is a complex, powerful machine; yet for all its computational horsepower, the process of committing anything to memory is nearly miraculous. Our brains are designed to forget, but we rely on memory--the building block of cognition--to survive and thrive in our lives and careers. Join Jay Turner, Director of Continuing Education at Georgia Public Library Service, for a no-holds-barred road trip through the latest findings in neurological research and brain-based learning theory. Explore how memories are formed, why we forget, and practical solutions to help employee training stick in the age of information overload.

Archive viewing options:

  • View full Archive (combined archive of audio, slides, and chat)
  • View attached files

Related Resources:

  • The Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory
  • "100 Trillion Connections," Carl Zimmer, Scientific American; Jan2011, Vol. 304 Issue 1, p58-63.
  • "Human memory strength is predicted by theta-frequency phase-locking of single neurons," Ueli Rutishauser, Ian B Ross, Adam N Mamelak, Erin M Schuman. Nature. London: Apr 8, 2010. Vol. 464, Iss. 7290; pg. 903
  • "The Limits of Intelligence," Douglas Fox, Scientific American; Jul2011, Vol. 305 Issue 1, p36-43
  • "Boosting Performance Through Self-Efficacy," Golnaz Sadri. T + D. Alexandria: Jun 2011. Vol. 65, Iss. 6; pg. 30
  • "Deeper mindfulness for better work performance," Graham Williams. Civil Engineering : Magazine of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering. Yeoville: Jan/Feb 2011. Vol. 19, Iss. 1; pg. 8
  • "Allocation of effort as a function of payoffs for individual tasks in a multitasking environment," Dongyuan Debbie Wang, Robert W Proctor, David F Pick. Behavior Research Methods. Austin: Aug 2009. Vol. 41, Iss. 3; pg. 705
  • "Memory Fix: Turn Up the Pressure." Thomas Crook, Prevention 60.10 (2008): 126.

Questions for discussion:

  1. How do you transition important information from your short-term to long-term memory so that you won’t forget it?
  2. How do you offload unimportant but memory-hogging information from your brain?

Start Date

10 August 2011

End Date

10 August 2011

Venue

Webinar

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