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007  Physical Description Fixed Field (Motion Picture) (R)

Input Standards

Required if applicable/Optional
1st Indicator  Undefined
blank character Undefined
2nd Indicator  Undefined
blank character Undefined
Subfields (R=Repeatable  NR=Nonrepeatable) Input Standards
‡a Category of material (007/00) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡b Specific material designation (007/01) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡d Color (007/03) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡e Motion picture presentation format (007/04) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡f Sound on medium or separate (007/05) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡g Medium for sound (007/06) (NR) Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡h Dimensions (007/07) (NR) Mandatory/Mandatory
‡i Configuration of playback channels (007/08) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡j Production elements (007/09) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡k Positive/Negative aspect (007/10) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡l Generation (007/11) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡m Base of film (007/12) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡n Refined categories of color (007/13) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡o Kind of color stock or print (007/14) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡p Deterioration stage (007/15) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡q Completeness (007/16) (NR) Optional/Optional
‡r Film inspection date (007/17–22) (NR) Optional/Optional

Definition

 
All formats

The physical characteristics of a motion picture. 007 is valid in all formats so you can code for the physical characteristics of the parts of an item such as accompanying material.

VIS

Use field 007 for motion pictures and their accompanying sound characteristics. Use for motion pictures whether published separately or as individual components of a kit.

Examples

Use the following examples as guidelines for entering data in field 007 for motion pictures.

007     m ‡b r ‡d c ‡e a ‡f a ‡g a ‡h d ‡i s
300     2 film reels (170 min.) : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c 16 mm
500     Stereophonic sound.
007     m ‡b r ‡d c ‡e a ‡f a ‡g b ‡h b
300     1 film reel (10 min.) : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c super 8 mm
500     Super 8 mm version has magnetic sound track.
007     m ‡b r ‡d c ‡e a ‡f a ‡g a ‡h d
007     m ‡b r ‡d c ‡e a ‡f a ‡g b ‡h b
300     1 film reel (14 min.) : ‡b sound, color ; ‡c 16 mm
500     Also issued in super 8 mm with magnetic sound.
007     m ‡b r ‡d c ‡e a ‡f a ‡g a ‡h d ‡i m ‡j n ‡k a ‡l r ‡m t ‡n a ‡o u ‡p a ‡q c ‡r 198606
[Item is a motion picture; on a reel; in color; standard sound aperture; on medium; optical track; 16 mm; monaural sound; production elements not applicable; positive emulsion; reference print/viewing copy; safety base (triacetate); three-layer color; kind of color stock unknown; no apparent deterioration; complete film; and film inspected June 1986.]
007     m ‡b r ‡d b ‡e f ‡h f ‡i n ‡j n ‡k a ‡l r ‡m t ‡n n ‡o n ‡p a ‡q i ‡r 198512
[Item is a motion picture; on a reel; in black-and-white; standard silent aperture; no sound; 35 mm; kind of sound and production elements not applicable; positive emulsion; reference print; safety base (triacetate); color categories and stock not applicable; no apparent deterioration; incomplete film; and film was inspected December 1985.]

1st Indicator

Undefined. The 1st indicator position is undefined and contains a blank ( blank character ).

blank character

Undefined

2nd Indicator

Undefined. The 2nd indicator position is undefined and contains a blank ( blank character ).

blank character

Undefined

Subfields

 
‡a Category of material

A one-character alphabetic code that indicates the category of material to which the item belongs is a motion picture.

m

Motion picture. The item is a motion picture, which is defined as a series of still pictures on film, with or without sound, designed to be projected in rapid succession to produce the optical effect of motion.

‡b Specific material designation

A one-character alphabetic code that describes the special class of material (usually the class of physical object) to which an item belongs (e.g., a film reel).

c

Film cartridge. A film cartridge is a permanently encased single reel of film with ends joined together to form a loop that provides playback without rewinding.

f

Film cassette. A film cassette is a permanently encased film that winds and rewinds reel-to-reel.

o

Film roll. A wound length of film not in a reel, cartridge, etc.

r

Film reel. An open reel of motion picture film designed for use with a projector having its own take-up reel. Includes sound track film intended to accompany visual images actually not present. Use for motion pictures, which are assumed to be reel-to-reel unless otherwise noted.

u

Unspecified. The specific material designation for the motion picture is not specified.

z

Other. A class of motion picture film for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡d Color

The color characteristics of a motion picture.

b

Black-and-white. The image is printed or executed in black-and-white.

c

Multicolored. The image is printed or executed in more than one color. Used for color photographic processes.

h

Hand-colored. The motion picture image, produced by a printing or photographic process, is hand colored. Rarely used with commercial films since these are not typically issued with hand coloring. Code h takes precedence over any other code.

m

Mixed. The work or collection is a combination of black-and-white, multicolored, hand colored, and/or other images.

n

Not applicable. Color characteristics are not applicable because the item has no images. Used, for example, when the item in hand is sound track film intended to accompany visual images not actually present.

u

Unknown. The color characteristics of the motion picture are not known.

z

Other. Color characteristics for which none of the other codes is appropriate (e.g., toned, stained, tinted, etc.).

‡e Motion picture presentation format

Presentation format is the format used in the production of a projected image (e.g., Cinerama, IMAX), indicating whether the motion picture uses a standard or special presentation format. Treat motion pictures as standard nonwide-screen (code a), unless otherwise noted. Codes b, c, d, and e apply to wide-screen presentation techniques.

a

Standard sound aperture (reduced frame). Use for nonwide-screen formats. Includes all standard sound 35 mm, 16 mm, and super 8 mm film. Should be used even for silent films in which a space has been left for the inclusion of a sound track, i.e., where a full frame silent picture has been cropped to allow space for a sound track.

b

Nonanamorphic (wide-screen). Wide-screen formats that achieve the wide-screen effect without optically compressing the image or requiring the use of special projection techniques. The nonanamorphic wide-screen process is primarily associated with 35 mm and larger film gauges where the image on the film is natural (not optically compressed) and of smaller frame height, which is expanded by projection on a wide screen through the use of normal lenses and the appropriate aperture plate to give the required aspect ratio. Includes Todd-AO, Super-Panavision, and other presentation formats that use spherical lenses to create a wide-screen effect.

c

3D. Use for films that achieve a three-dimensional effect originally through the use of two projectors which superimpose two images of the film on the screen (usually a wide screen). It is usually associated with 35 mm film. Polarized lenses worn by viewers help to create the impression of depth and dimension.

d

Anamorphic (wide-screen). Films that achieve the wide-screen effect through the use of an image that is optically compressed or squeezed horizontally. It is then expanded to the correct proportions by projection on a wide screen with the use of special lenses that give greater magnification laterally than vertically. Introduced and adopted for commercial use in 1953 under the name of CinemaScope, followed by Techniscope (1963), Naturama, Panavision, Grandscope, Megascope, etc. Also used for 16 mm film that employs this process.

e

Other wide-screen format. Any other wide-screen process not covered by other codes. Includes Cinerama, Viterama, Cinemiracle, Circarama, and other formats that achieve a wide-screen effect though the use of simultaneous projection of separate prints on very large, sometimes deeply curved screens through the use of multiprojectors that build up the projected picture by a series of images, generally side-by-side. OCLC previously defined code e as other. That definition is obsolete. Use code z for other.

f

Standard silent aperture (full frame). Use for 35 mm film on which the exposed picture is approximately the width of the space between the perforation holes of the frame. Standard format for silent film from about 1899 until the late 1920s when sound film was introduced and the frame size decreased to make room for the sound track.

u

Unknown. The presentation format of the motion picture is not known.

z

Other. A presentation format for which none of the other codes is appropriate. An example of this is the 70 mm IMAX format which is a non-rectangular, circular 180 degree limited use format that is not standardized. IMAX may not technically be considered a wide-screen format because it does not have an aspect ratio, but it does achieve a wide-screen effect.

‡f Sound on medium or separate

Use to indicate whether the sound is on the same medium as the film or on a separate medium. Assume that the item has sound and that the sound is on the medium, unless otherwise noted. If the item is silent, do not use subfield ‡f.

a

Sound on medium. Sound is on the item. Always used when coding a separate sound track that is physically part of the film (e.g., magnetic strip on edge of film base).

b

Sound separate from medium. Sound is on a separate medium, designed to accompany the images (e.g., a cassette).

u

Unknown. The presence or absence of sound on the item is not known.

‡g Medium for sound

Indicates the specific medium used to carry the sound of an item (whether that sound is carried on the item itself or is in the form of accompanying material) and the type of sound playback required. Used in conjunction with the information coded in subfield ‡f (Sound on medium or separate) and subfield ‡h (Dimensions). Typically, the carriers of sound are: 1) optical and/or magnetic track on a film reel or encased in a cassette or cartridge; 2) audio or video tape that may be on a reel or encased in a cassette or cartridge; and 3) sound or videodisc. Assume sound on tape to be magnetic. Use codes c through f for films in which the sound is separate. If the item is silent, do not use subfield ‡g.

a

Optical sound track on motion picture film. Sound to accompany a motion picture is carried on an optical track that is part of the film. Optical sound is the most commonly used process for 16 and 35 mm film.

b

Magnetic sound track on motion picture film. Sound to accompany a motion picture is carried on a separate magnetic track that is part of the film. 70 mm motion picture films often include magnetic sound tracks. Generally, 8 mm films have magnetic sound tracks. A brown or copper strip on the film indicates a magnetic sound track.

c

Magnetic audio tape in cartridge. Accompanying sound is carried on a magnetic audio tape cartridge.

d

Sound disc. Sound to accompany an item is carried on a sound disc. Sound discs include 7, 10, and 12 inch vinyl phonograph records and 4 3/4 inch compact discs.

e

Magnetic audio tape on reel. Sound to accompany an item is carried on a reel of magnetic audio tape.

f

Magnetic audio tape in cassette. Sound to accompany an item is carried on a cassette of magnetic audio tape.

g

Optical and magnetic sound track on motion picture film. Sound to accompany a motion picture is carried on both an optical and magnetic track.

h

Videotape. Sound to accompany an item is included as part of a videotape. Videotape is not ordinarily used to record only sound.

i

Videodisc. Sound to accompany an item is included as part of a videodisc. Videodiscs are not ordinarily used to record only sound. A distinction must be made between videodiscs (e.g., 12 inch laser-scan videodiscs that include video information) and compact discs that are used to record sound only (e.g., 4 3/4 inch audio compact discs). The technology to physically record video or audio information on digital disc systems is the same.

u

Unknown. The medium for sound is not known.

z

Other. A medium of sound for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡h Dimensions

Use to indicate the width of motion picture film. Only codes that exactly match the measurements of the item as given in the physical description should be used. If no code exactly matches, code z is used.

a

Standard 8 mm. The width of the motion picture is standard 8mm. Motion pictures termed Mauer 8 mm are recorded as code a.

b

Super 8 mm/single 8 mm. The width of the motion picture film is super 8 mm. Single 8 mm motion picture film is a Japanese equivalent of super 8 mm motion picture film.

c

9.5 mm. The width of the motion picture film is 9.5 mm.

d

16 mm. The width of the motion picture film is 16 mm.

e

28 mm. The width of the motion picture film is 28 mm.

f

35 mm. The width of the motion picture film is 35 mm.

g

70 mm. The width of the motion picture film is 70 mm.

u

Unknown. The dimensions of the motion picture film are not known.

z

Other. Dimensions of motion picture film for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡i Configuration of playback channels

Use to indicate the configuration of playback channels for the sound portion of a motion picture. This should be coded based on a clear indication of intended playback. These codes do not refer to the configuration of channels originally recorded unless those channels are all intended to be available on playback. The code should match information in the physical description or in a note.

k

Mixed. More than one configuration of playback channels is available on a single motion picture. An example would be a film with both monaural optical and stereophonic magnetic sound tracks.

m

Monaural. The sound portion of a motion picture is configured to be played back on one channel.

n

Not applicable. Use when the film is silent, has no sound, or the sound is on a separate medium (subfield ‡f is coded b). Also used when describing an item with separate sound. The configuration of playback channels for the separate sound track would be described in another 007 representing the sound recording on accompanying material (e.g., sound on cassette).

q

Quadraphonic, multichannel, or surround. The sound portion of a motion picture is configured to be played back on more than two channels. Used for Dolby surround sound tracks and other multichannel techniques.

s

Stereophonic. The sound portion of a motion picture is configured to be played back on two separate channels. Use when the medium is not monaural and when it is not possible to ascertain that multiple playback sources are available or intended.

u

Unknown. The configuration of sound playback channels is not known.

z

Other. A configuration of playback channels for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡j Production elements

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate whether the film is part of a complete production or is a preliminary or post-production element. Materials described in this character position do not represent a complete work (i.e., a finished film). If more than one element applies, code for the predominant element.

a

Work print. A print from the original camera footage that is edited to a fine degree to achieve the final version.

b

Trims. Sections of shots remaining after the desired portions have been incorporated into the workprint.

c

Outtakes. Shots discarded in the editing of a film.

d

Rushes. First positive prints from the laboratory of the previous day's shooting. Also called dailies.

e

Mixing tracks. Separate sound tracks that are combined for the final film sound track. Mixing tracks may include music, sound effects, and dialog tracks.

f

Title bands/inter-title rolls. Printed captions or titles separated from their corresponding picture.

g

Production rolls. Various types of production elements (film usually wound on cores) before they are cut and assembled into reels.

n

Not applicable. Use if the item is not a production element.

z

Other. Production elements for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡k Positive/Negative aspect

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate whether the motion picture film is positive or negative. The positive/negative aspect of motion picture film is related to the kind of emulsion bonded to and supported by a film base.

a

Positive. A film in which the colors and/or tonal values are the same as the original subject matter.

b

Negative. For a black-and-white film, tonal values are the opposite of those in the original subject matter. For a color film, tonal values are the complements of the original subject matter (e.g., red appears as green in a color negative).

n

Not applicable. Use for a film that does not have a positive/negative aspect.

u

Unknown. Use when the positive/negative aspect of the film is not known.

z

Other. Use for a positive/negative aspect for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡l Generation

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate how far away from the original material the item is (e.g., the actual negative film or original videotape in the camera). Generation data is used to evaluate the quality of available copies, to make preservation decisions, and to identify materials available for viewing and research. The concept of generation represents the photographic process required to create, duplicate, and preserve moving image materials. Material that is produced successively from the original is second, third, fourth, etc. generation material (e.g., original negative to master-positive to duplicate negative to reference print).

d

Duplicate. A duplicate that is usually negative, referred to as a dupe neg, and is a reproduction of the original picture or sound track. A duplicate negative is made from a master positive, which in turn was made from an earlier negative. A duplicate is at least three generations from the original. Duplicate negatives may be prepared either to obtain characteristics not present in the original image, as in special effects work, or to protect and extend the production availability of the assembled original negative as when duplicate negatives are prepared for release printing simultaneously at different labs.

e

Master. A master that is usually positive and referred to as a master positive. It is a specially prepared positive print made from an earlier generation negative film and used for the preparation of duplicate negatives rather than for projection. The master is normally considered second generation material.

o

Original. an original that is usually negative. It is film exposed in a camera and thus of better quality than any subsequent generation or derivative. When referring to older film, an original is almost always a negative. However, the original film may also be a reversal positive.

r

Reference print/viewing copy. A reference print (ref print) that is defined technically as a release print that has been approved by the producer and director of a film. A reference print may also mean a print kept as a reference print to evaluate the quality of subsequent prints. In film archives, the term is used to indicate that a film may be viewed by researchers. It is not original, master, or duplicate material.

u

Unknown. The generation stage of the film is not known.

z

Other. A generation stage for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡m Base of film

Primarily for archival use. The base material of the moving image, which is the underlying physical material of the motion picture resource. Safety base film is a comparatively nonflammable film base that meets the standard requirements for a safety base. On some film, the phrase safety film appears on the edge of motion pictures. Nitrate film base is a highly flammable film base that does not meet the requirements for safety base film.

a

Safety base, undetermined. A safety base film whose type has not been identified.

c

Safety base, acetate undetermined. An acetate safety base film whose exact type cannot be determined, i.e., where it is unknown if the type is diacetate or triacetate.

d

Safety base, diacetate. A cellulose diacetate film base. Introduced before World War I for home movies, diacetate base was more expensive and unpredictable than nitrate base and so failed to gain acceptance in professional 35 mm film production.

i

Nitrate base. A cellulose nitrate film base. Cellulose nitrate support or base was used in the manufacture of 35 mm film (and some 17.5 mm film) until 1951. Nitrate base film is no longer manufactured. Nitrate film is highly flammable. It does not meet the requirements for safety base film.

m

Mixed base (nitrate and safety). A combination of nitrate and safety base film. The use of a mixed base was common in the early 1950s when nitrate base stock shots were spliced with safety base film for low-budget motion pictures. In such releases, up to 50% of the film consisted of stock shots on nitrate base film.

n

Not applicable. The item does not have a film base, e.g., paper film.

p

Safety base, polyester. A film base made of a synthetic resin (e.g., ESTAR Base).

r

Safety base, mixed. Spliced together safety base films, with no nitrate film. Do not use if the spliced film is nitrate based.

t

Safety base, triacetate. A cellulose triacetate film base. Cellulose triacetate is a high acetal compound with very low flammability and slow burning characteristics. From 1951, triacetate has been used for professional as well as amateur produced moving image film.

u

Unknown. The base of the film is not known.

z

Other. A film base for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡n Refined categories of color

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate more specific color characteristics of the moving image than are contained in subfield ‡d (Color). If the color portions of the item include more than one color process, a code for the predominant color process is given. If no single process predominates, use code z. The additional color processes are described in field 500 (General Note).

a

3 layer color. Film with three layers of emulsion: cyan, magenta, and yellow. Each layer is sensitive to its own primary color. Beginning in the early 1950s, color film work has been done primarily on 3 layer, also called multilayer, film. This process is also known as integral tri-pack.

b

2 color, single strip. A color system in which a single strip of film was exposed with pairs of images by means of a beam-splitter prism. One of the pairs of images was exposed through a red filter and one through a green filter. The resulting negative was used to produce both prints consisting of two strips cemented together, and, later in the history of the process, two color dye transfer prints. Also known as red and green Technicolor, the process was used exclusively by Technicolor and had its heyday between 1922 and 1933, although it was used until 1936 for animated cartoons.

c

Undetermined 2 color. A system of color reproduction, which cannot be specifically identified, in which the visible spectrum is divided either into blue and red regions or into green and red regions for recording and presentation. Although extensively used in early color film processes, the inherent inability of two components to reproduce a satisfactory range of hues rendered all such systems obsolete when three-color processes became readily available and relatively inexpensive.

d

Undetermined 3 color. A system of color reproduction, which cannot be specifically identified, in which the visible spectrum is divided into three sections, normally red, green, and blue, for the purposes of recording and presentation.

e

3 strip color. A color system in which three color-separation negatives were produced on black-and-white film. 3 strip color is often used synonymously with the trademark Technicolor. In the Technicolor three-component system, light reflected from the subject matter is transmitted through the single lens of a special camera where it strikes a prism. One part of the light is passed through the prism and a green filter to produce a green record. The remainder of the light is reflected from the prism and absorbed by negatives to produce red and blue records. Each of the negatives is developed to produce new negatives that resemble black-and-white negatives.

f

2 strip color. A color system in which two strips of film, one to record red light and one to record blue, were run through the camera simultaneously and exposed through the base of the front piece of film. These two strips of negatives were then used to produce prints of duplitized film stock (film stock with emulsion on both sides of the base), with a red-dyed image on one side, and a blue-dyed or -toned image on the other. Although extensively used in early color film processes, the inherent inability of two components to reproduce the visible color spectrum rendered all such systems obsolete when three-color processes became readily available. The process used from about 1929 to about 1950 by, among others, the following companies: Cinecolor, Magnacolor, and Multicolor.

g

Red strip. In the Cinecolor process, the color separation record of blue-green light that prints as red. In the Super Cinecolor process, the color separation record of green light that prints as magenta (called "red" by Cinecolor). In the two-color Technicolor process, the color separation record of green light that prints as red.

h

Blue or green strip. In the Cinecolor process and the Super Cinecolor process, the blue strip is the color separation record of red light that prints as blue-green (called "blue" by Cinecolor). In the two-color Technicolor process, the green strip is the color separation record of magenta-red light that prints as green.

i

Cyan strip. A color separation record of red light that prints as cyan.

j

Magenta strip. A color separation record of green light that prints as magenta.

k

Yellow strip. A color separation record of blue light that prints as yellow.

l

S E N 2. Successive Exposure Negative 2. S E N 2 is a method of motion picture color photography in which two color separation negative images were recorded on one strip of film by photographing each frame two times successively through red and blue filters. The resultant negative was subsequently optically printed by the use of a skip-frame mechanism. The process was restricted to the photography of animated cartoon and puppet subjects in which the movement from frame to frame could be controlled. The successive exposure process was rendered obsolete by the introduction of 3 layer (multilayer) color negative film.

m

S E N 3. Successive Exposure Negative 3. Successive exposure negative 3. S E N 3 is a method of motion picture color photography in which three color separation negative images were recorded on one strip of film by photographing each frame three times successively through red, blue, and green filters. The resultant negative was subsequently optically printed by the use of a skip-frame mechanism. The process was usually restricted to the photography of animated cartoon and puppet subjects in which the movement from frame to frame could be controlled. The successive exposure process was rarely used after the introduction of 3 layer (multilayer) color negative film.

n

Not applicable. Use if the item is not a color film.

p

Sepia tone. A sepia tone, which is a conversion of a black-and-white image in silver to sepia (a brownish grey to dark olive brown) by metallic compounds. Sepia was the most common tone used, and was used in black-and-white prints of films for special sequences to enhance the dramatic or pictorial effect.

q

Other tone. Color created by chemically altering the color, for example, uranium produces red, or increasing the brilliance of a print. Toning differs from tinting in that the clear portions of the film remain unaffected. Only the silver image of the positive film becomes colored.

r

Tint. Early in the history of tinting, a tint was created by dipping film in a bath of chemical dyes to get a dominant hue. Later, raw stock became available already tinted in eleven stock shades: peach blow, blue for moonlight, amber for firelight, etc. The tinting of a film may be in whole or in part. Tinting was common until the advent of sound.

s

Tinted and toned. Color has been added to a film by using a tinted base and a toned emulsion.

t

Stencil color. Color is added using stencils, one cut for each color. Stencil color replaced the hand-coloring used in earlier years.

u

Unknown. The refined category of color is not known.

v

Hand-colored. The image, produced by a photographic process, is hand colored. Used whenever code h (hand-colored) is present in subfield ‡d (Color).

z

Other. Color characteristics for which none of the other codes is appropriate, such as when no single color process is predominant.

‡o Kind of color stock or print

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate the type of color film stock or color print of the motion picture film.

a

Imbibition dye transfer prints. Film color prints created by the transfer of two or more differently colored dye images to a single strip of blank film. The dye transfer process was used only to produce prints. Imbibition dye transfer prints can be produced from film originally shot on either multi-strip or multi-layer film. The process was used only by the Technicolor Company from ca. 1928 to ca. 1975. The patents were sold to the People's Republic of China, and since ca. 1980, the process has been available only in China.

b

Three layer stock. Color film stock with three layers of emulsion: cyan, magenta, and yellow. Each layer is sensitive to its own primary color. Since the early 1950s, most color films have been both shot and printed on this stock. It is also called multilayer film stock.

c

Three layer stock, low fade. Color film stock with three layers of emulsion: cyan, magenta, and yellow. Each layer is sensitive to its own primary color and stabilized to reduce color fading as much as possible. It has been available since ca. 1983.

d

Duplitized stock. Color print stock with emulsion on both sides. Usually one side is dyed red, and the other side is dyed or toned blue.

n

Not applicable. Use if the item is not a color film.

u

Unknown. The type of color film stock is not known.

z

Other. A type of color film stock for which none of the other codes is appropriate.

‡p Deterioration stage

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate the level of deterioration of the motion picture film. Use codes b through h for recording nitrate deterioration. Use codes k through m for recording deterioration of non-nitrate materials (e.g., safety film). Codes are listed in each category according to the seriousness of the deterioration. If more than one condition is applicable to the film in hand, the code for the most serious condition is recorded.

a

None apparent. No deterioration is apparent on either nitrate or non-nitrate motion picture film.

b

Nitrate: suspicious odor. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which a suspicious odor is emitted.

c

Nitrate: pungent odor. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which a pungent odor is emitted.

d

Nitrate: brownish, discoloration, fading, dusty. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which the film image is fading and the emulsion exhibits brownish discoloration.

e

Nitrate: sticky. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which the film emulsion has become sticky, emitting a faint noxious odor.

f

Nitrate: frothy, bubbles, blisters. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which the film emulsion has become softened and blistered with gas bubbles, emitting a strong odor.

g

Nitrate: congealed. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which the film has congealed into a solid mass, emitting a strong noxious odor.

h

Nitrate: powder. Used for recording nitrate deterioration in which the film has disintegrated into brownish, acrid powder.

k

Non-nitrate: detectable deterioration. Used to record deterioration of non-nitrate materials (safety film, etc.) in its early stages, including the presence of diacetate odor.

l

Non-nitrate: advanced deterioration. Used to record deterioration of non-nitrate materials (safety film, etc.) in its advanced stages.

m

Non-nitrate: disaster. Used to record deterioration of non-nitrate materials (safety film, etc.) in its final stages.

‡q Completeness

Primarily for archival use. Use to indicate whether the motion picture being cataloged is judged to be complete.

c

Complete. The motion picture being cataloged is judged to be complete.

i

Incomplete. The motion picture being cataloged is judged to be incomplete.

n

Not applicable. Use when completeness is not applicable to the type of motion picture, e.g., home movies, unedited footage, outtakes, and in some cases, unidentified material, etc.

u

Unknown. The completeness of the motion picture is not known.

‡r Film inspection date

Primarily for archival use. Six characters that indicate the most recent film inspection date; the date is recorded in the pattern yyyymm (year/month). The film inspection date may be the date the item was cataloged or the date it was viewed. A hyphen is used for any unknown portion of the date. If the date is completely unknown, six hyphens are recorded.

Inspection Date Enter
September 1981 ‡r 198109

1986

[Inspected in 1986; the month is not known]

‡r 1986--
[Inspection date is not known] ‡r ------

Indexing

For indexing and searching information, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, field 007.

For information on the relation of material types to RDA terms and codes, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, RDA Terms and Codes.

For information on material type indexing in various OCLC services, see Searching WorldCat Indexes, Material Type (includes links in Notes row to RDA terms and codes and Format or Document codes and values).

For information on material type names and codes (based mainly on the Leader, 006, 007, 008), see Searching WorldCat Indexes, Material Type Names and Codes.

Printing

Field 007 does not print.

This page last revised: December 2, 2013